Mark Ewing

Contact Me: mee@tcyoung.co.uk
Job title: Partner
Tel: 0141 225 2568
Mark Ewing

Mark Ewing has worked with TC Young for over 30 years, and been a partner since 1987. During that time he has worked with a large number of housing associations, charities and other voluntary sector organisations as part as the firm’s commercial team.

Mark is accredited by the Law Society of Scotland as a specialist in charity law, one of a small number in Scotland.  Mark is especially experienced in providing advice on charity law, governance and regulation for large and complex charities and charity led group structures.

His experience has been acknowledged in Legal 500 and Chambers legal guide where he is a ‘leading individual’ and where clients highlight his expertise, saying: “He’s excellent on charity law, well respected and experienced.”    

He frequently advises clients on:

  • Group structures and subsidiaries
  • Banking, private finance arrangements and re-financing
  • Constitutional and governance arrangements
  • Housing association rules and good governance
  • Charity and housing law compliance
  • Housing stock transfers including support services
  • Acquisitions
  • Joint ventures
  • Partnership arrangements/negotiations and strategic alliances
  • Charitable law obligations and the tax implications

Working closely with clients undertaking community regeneration activities, Mark is experienced in all aspects of such work including appropriate legal structures, governance and funding arrangements.

Mark has also established himself as a key advisor to community renewable projects and has acted in a number of wind turbine and hydro projects He has advised clients on the complex banking, technical and commercial contracts that are involved in these projects.

He was also the lead legal advisor acting on behalf of Machrihanish Airbase Community Company in their successful acquisition of the former airbase.  Significant regeneration projects are planned for the former airbase including renewable energy generation.

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